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annual Home Office statistics on animal research

On Wednesday 20th July the Home Office published its 2015 statistics on animals used in scientific procedures as well as the Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU) annual report. Journalists came along to hear the latest figures from two Home Office officials, along with responses from three leading experts who have a broad overview of animal research and gave their thoughts on the reasons behind any rise or fall in the statistics or issues raised in the report. read more

expert reaction to alternative for animals during toxicity testing

Studies which assess the toxicology of new drugs typically have some element of animal testing, and a paper published in the journal Nature Communications has described a method using in vitro tests which are carried out without animals. The authors report that these tests were better than animal models at predicting toxicity of drugs to humans. read more

Annual Home Office statistics on animal research

This briefing focused on the publication from the Home Office of its 2014 statistics on animals used in scientific procedures as well as the Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU) annual report for 2014. The latest figures were presented alongside responses from three leading experts who have a broad overview of animal research could give their thoughts on the reasons behind any changes in the statistics or issues raised in the annual report. The ‘Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals 2014’ is compiled from returns provided by project licence holders. The annual report provides an account of the Home Office’s activities in relation to the regulation of animal testing. read more

questioning the quality of animal research

Animal studies are a vital part of scientific endeavour, particularly for clinical trials, but it is vital that the information gleaned from them is robust and that animals are not being put through unnecessary procedures. Researchers have been doing a systematic review of trials and assessed them for their statistical robustness. read more

expert reaction to new study examining robustness of animal-based research over the last 70 years

Animal studies are a vital part of scientific endeavour, particularly for clinical trials, but it is vital that the information gleaned from them is robust and that animals are not being put through unnecessary procedures. Researchers have been doing a systematic review of trials and assessed them for their statistical robustness. The research, published in PLoS Biology, looks at issues such as randomisation and blinding which increase rigour and reduce the risk of bias. read more

what can animals tell us about psychiatry?

Psychiatry has made huge leaps in recent years as it has become ever more scientific in nature. Our understanding of disorders, drugs and therapies has grown dramatically, much of it through research with animals. But are mice and rats good models for these complex diseases, can depression in dogs really equate with depression in people, and how much does that matter? read more

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